FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY GREEN SCREEN

FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY GREEN SCREEN

Florida State University’s College of Motion Picture Arts has recently unveiled their new green screen stage lit exclusively with Cineo HS. The 21′ x 21′ x 10′ foot high cyclorama is lit entirely by three HS systems. “The driving force behind the whole dedicated green screen [is that] we recently started new undergraduate programs in animation and digital arts,” explained Chuck Allen, Head of Post Production for the College. “We were turned on to HS by Cinematography Professor Keith Slade, who used them on the feature film War Room he worked on last summer.”

The building went through major renovations to prepare to house the new Digital Arts and Animation curriculum. “Because there is a great need for green screen work we decided it would be in our best interest to plan for and make dedicated space available,” explained Allen. “The space is made available to all students—but is primarily used in the Digital Arts program and cinematography classes.”

“Thus far we are extremely pleased with the Cineo system,” said Ronald Honn, Assistant Professor at the College of Motion Picture Arts. “Even in a relatively tight insert stage space, we are able to light and shoot green screen elements that key magnificently. The combination of the adjustable Cineo lighting and the green screen stage construction and the fact that it works so well using a relatively inexpensive chroma key paint opens up many options to us—including building tracking markers and reference objects which can be painted with a green hue mixed one stop above the backdrop green—giving us tracking markers that track extremely well and can be keyed out easily.”

QVC GERMANY LIGHTS ITS STUDIOS WITH TRUCOLOR HS

 

QVC GERMANY LIGHTS ITS STUDIOS WITH TRUCOLOR HS

For the last ten years, QVC Germany has observed the development of LED lighting in the professional lighting market, mainly with an interest in soft light fixtures. “Every segment in the entertainment industry has its own set of challenges,” explained Reinhold Trilling, Manager of Visual Operations at QVC Germany. “You always need to adapt the equipment to achieve the look that suits [the subject] best.”

QVC is challenge because it is a seventeen-hour live production with no rehearsal time, cameras shooting at all angles, and subjects walking almost everywhere on the set. QVC originally decided to rig soft 160º lighting in the form of 5 KW and 2.5 KW incandescent soft lights and an assortment of fresnels.

About two years ago, Lights Camera Action (Cineo’s UK dealer) presented QVC with the TruColor HS. “When we switched it on, we thought, that’s just what we were looking for—a compact LED soft light fixture with a hell of an output, but it only draws 400w.” said Trilling.

“We arranged a test with seven fixtures on one of our sets. We first tested them at 3200K, which worked really well, but we ended up switching them to 5600K.” explained Trilling. QVC chose 5600K because it is similar to sunlight, which is best for allowing the eye to see all colors, especially blues, which are cut in 3200K but look great in 5600K. Another reason for using this color temperature is the increased use of smartphones, tablets, and TVs on air, which can look blue when shot in a tungsten balanced studio. “We had been waiting so long to get a decent 5600K fixture that you can dim to zero, and here it was.” said Trilling.

For two studios, which measure 800 sq m & 200 sq m (8611 sq ft & 2152 sq ft), QVC ordered 120 pole operated TruColor HS fixtures. This meant QVC went from 302 Kw incandescent down to 48 Kw LED, saving a great amount of power.

Another feature of the TruColor HS that QVC has found useful is the variety of accessories available. QVC has found the fixtures perfect for rigging, and has been able to set up a large amount of fixtures in a small area. Trilling also likes the power supply for the HS: “Some dislike separated ballasts, but I prefer this feature, because it makes troubleshooting problems more efficient,” he explained. “It was a good choice for QVC to work with Cineo.”

PETER J. NICOLL SHOOTS A CAPITOL FOURTH WITH HS

 A CAPITOL FOURTH  SHOT BY PETER J. NICOLL USING HS

Cinematographer Peter J. Nicoll, who recently used TruColor HS to light talent for KQED’s A Capitol Fourth, details his experience working with the fixture:

“PBS puts on a concert on the fourth of July each year. As the roll up to the event, PBS creates what they call “Tune-Ins” that feature the year’s performers inviting people to tune in at 8pm on the fourth to enjoy the performance. I was contracted by PBS and Capitol Concerts to provide a field location in front of the Capitol where we could expose the Capitol dome and the talent as they came off stage. There were limitations in terms of location and power in as to where we should set up, and the set up had to be fast and flexible enough to be ready to pick up the talent at their convenience. The light in the capitol would move through our shot from back lighting the dome in the morning to front lighting the dome from noon on into afternoon and ensure that we got decent detail in the shot of the Capitol’s exterior. To me, this meant a lot of soft light on the talent in order to help offset the big white thing behind them.

My overall experience working with the HS was excellent. In many ways it exceeded my expectations in doing what it does best: providing bright, soft light up-close on talent. I am never a fan of ballasts, but the ballasts seemed solid and I found it easy to run the longer head cables and keep the ballasts near me in case I needed to dim the units. The HS replaced some big lights that needed a lot of grip and a lot of power to use them. I could put the HS right on the talent and the light was excellent.

Based on the requirements of the project, I didn’t have the room to modify the light at all. Previously the project had used 1200 watt HMIs to light the talent, and I suspect that was heavily diffused. Based on my client input and my scout, I knew we were going to be limited on three things: crew, space and power. To me, the Cineo was a perfect solution as it’s really designed to be up close to talent with a minimum of heat and I was really impressed as to how soft the light was—I didn’t need to back it up to put it through a frame of diffusion and its wrap was really very good. I needed as much punch as possible on a bright sunny day with the US Capitol in the background, and I could put the light as close as I could get it to the edge of frame, very close the the talents eye line and they all seemed very comfortable.

My favorite thing [about working with the HS] was running the entire production, lights, prompter, Pix240 and monitor off one 20 AMP circuit. I had a rather nerve-wracking call with my producer the night before the shoot who told me that we were moving the location because of rain and he was very nervous about power. We ended up with two 20 AMP runs and we really only needed one. This is really where this unit and others like it make a huge difference—less power, less cable equals more speed in setup and a greater flexibility in where you can go.

I’ve been converting over to LED/Daylight fixtures slowly and trying to make some solid decisions. I need to be in the middle of three things at once and drop a light in and see how it does in a very real, very difficult situation. For this project the HS did exactly what I wanted it to do with no mods, very quickly. The HS excels at really bright, soft light.”

You can see more of Peter’s work at http://www.peterjnicoll.com and follow him on Twitter @PeterjNicoll.

FOX SUPER BOWL XLVIII BROADCAST CENTER

FOX SUPER BOWL XLVIII BROADCAST CENTER

FOX Sports recently commissioned a three-story broadcast center in Times Square for their Super Bowl XVIII broadcast. Production Resource Group, L.L.C. (PRG) completed construction of the structure in late January despite dismal New York weather conditions.

PRG lighting designer Bobby Allen used the Cineo TruColor HS throughout the facility. The Broadcast Center served as the broadcast base of the network’s Super Bowl coverage, including their live game day broadcast.

Standing at 65 feet, the Broadcast Center has been certified by the Times Square Alliance as the tallest non-permanent structure ever erected in Times Square. The fully functional, environmentally conscious broadcast facility boasts 8,100 square feet of usable space, a mini Astroturf football field on the roof, and a spot for Cleatus, FOX Sport’s sixteen-foot animated robot.

ON LOCATION – VIETNAM

BUILDING LARGE, SOFT SOURCES WITH TRUCOLOR HS™

Shooting outdoors in Vietnam could prove to be a daunting experience for any DP, but for Trevor Forrest, setting up to shoot scenes for “Noble” (the Christina Noble biopic), gaffer Eddie Knight brought his years of experience in difficult locations to bear.

Knight (whose credits are too deep to list here), chose to use TruColor HS to fill this scene and numerous other shots throughout the production.

“The soft strong light of the TruColor HS worked beautifully to fill an entire car scene in Vietnam, while we used a hard M18 HMI to raise the temperature and contrast to mimic the Vietnamese heat.

We had a great time in some challenging places, and the HS was used in most of them to give the reality of Vietnam a little polish and beauty whenever we could.”

– Trevor Forrest, DP

DAVID LANDAU SHOOTS STRAY WITH TRUCOLOR LS

DAVID LANDAU SHOOTS STRAY WITH TRUCOLOR LS

 

Director of Photography David Landau recently used two TruColor LS on the set of Stray, an indie Kickstarter-funded drama produced and directed by Nena Eskridge.

“I love the fixture. The fact that it has a very small profile with the big amount of intensity we can get out of it is amazing,” Landau said. “The whole movie was tiny little rooms,” he explained. “That’s the wonderful thing [about the LS], you can put them in corners. They’re soft and powerful and wrap beautifully. They’re easy to hide and they can be two feet from the talent. We had one rigged up in the corner of a tiny little stairwell, and it gave us exactly what we needed. It gave us things that we couldn’t do with a fluorescent fixture.”

Landau also used a panel-less LS to create a blue light effect for a bar scene. “We did have opal over it,” he explains, “but it gave a great blue look.”

The low power draw of the fixture was also an asset when shooting on location. “The little apartment that we were shooting in had horrible wiring from the 70s. It was great that we were only drawing 150 watts,” Landau said. “No light is fail-safe, but this fixture is pretty fail-safe. You’re not going to catch anything on fire.”

Stray is currently in post-production. The crew shot the first fifteen minutes of the film three years ago to aid fundraising to produce the feature. “I think it’s going to have a great festival run,” Landau said.

Landau is the head of cinematography at Fairleigh Dickinson University. His book Lighting for Cinematography, published by Bloomsbury Press, will be available later this month.

BUILDING LARGE, SOFT SOURCES WITH TRUCOLOR HS™

BUILDING LARGE, SOFT SOURCES WITH TRUCOLOR HS™

 

TruColor HS is proving to be the ideal lighting source to provide soft lighting from small to very, very large.

With the release of two new mounting options, TruColor HS units can be connected together to make soft sources that directly output over 50,000 lumens, while drawing only 10 amps. The TruColor XS double yoke works without any diffusion to provide a 160° smooth spread with a source size of 2’ x 2’, similar to a traditional 6K soft source. The TruColor SPACE allows hanging two HS fixtures as a spacelight, which provides equivalent output and spread of a traditional 6K spacelight and can incorporate standard spacelight accessories.

For even larger sources, multiple HS units can work together to build softboxes of any size. For example, L.A. Prep used eight HS units to build a 10’ x 30’ softbox for their car photography stage in Los Angeles.

Need an even bigger source? A major feature film currently in production used ten HS fixtures to fill a 30’ x 50’ box to provide overhead ambient lighting for exterior nighttime scenes.

The versatile TruColor HS from Cineo Lighting is the ultimate soft source for lighting film, television and still photography.

THE X-FACTOR RELIES ON TRUCOLOR™ TO LIGHT THE STARS OF TOMORROW

THE X-FACTOR RELIES ON TRUCOLOR™ TO LIGHT THE STARS OF TOMORROW

 

Since the show’s U.S. debut in 2011, TruColor HS from Cineo Lighting has been used throughout the production of Freemantle’s The X-Factor, which shoots at CBS Television City in Los Angeles, airing on Fox.

The show’s Lighting Director, Darran Webb explains: “We use these lights everywhere…on-location, behind the scenes, on-the-road. They are our go-to source for both the auditions and performances on the show.”

Jeff Kirschner, the show’s gaffer adds “The versatility of the TruColor lights makes them a real problem-solver, especially when we’re out with our field crews. We can shoot virtually anywhere without lighting challenges.”

TruColor HS and LS can also be seen on several other Freemantle shows, including American Idol and America’s Got Talent.

CINEO’S TRUCOLOR TO TASK ON GODZILLA BY SEAMUS MCGARVERY

SEAMUS MCGARVERY, BSC PUTS CINEO’S TRUCOLOR TO TASK ON GODZILLA

Warner Brothers’ latest installment in the Godzilla legacy has just completed filming in Vancouver, BC, using over 30 TruColor HS lighting systems.

Gaffer Stuart Haggerty built many into the set, with several more used as portable lighting throughout the production. The HS fixtures were often fitted with Chimera softboxes to create beautiful large sources for key work.

The TruColor HS also performed well as effect lights on the film: by controlling them through DMX they were used to effectively simulate gunfire and lightning.

The new Godzilla stars Aaron Taylor-Johnson and Bryan Cranston and is scheduled for release in 2014.

CINEO SWEEPS THE 2014 AWARDS SEASON

CINEO SWEEPS THE 2014 AWARDS SEASON

 

TruColor HS and LS soft lights from Cineo were many lighting designers’ first choice for numerous U.S. televised award shows this season:
The 56th Annual Grammy Awards (CBS)
The Producers Guild of America Awards
The NFL Honors (FOX)
The 66th Primetime Emmy Awards (ABC)
The Independent Spirit Awards (IFC)
The SAG Awards (TBS)
The Golden Globes (NBC)
The Academy Awards (ABC)
If you tuned in to any of these shows, you saw how well Cineo’s bright, color-correct fixtures work with natural daylight, incandescent and HMI lighting sources.

“I always anticipate high demand for Cineo fixtures around awards season,” explains Paul Kobelja, VP Motion Picture and Television Rental for DPS, Los Angeles. “They are always in great demand for high-profile live televised events.”