Lighting Technology Joins the Digital Age (TVTechnology February 2015)

Lighting Technology Joins the Digital Age

LEDs poised to dominate, HMI holds for high outputsFebruary 26, 2015

 
Cineo Lighting’s Maverick uses the company’s Remote Phosphor Technology in a field light.

BOSTON—While high-profile advancements in cameras, image capture and fancy displays have been stealing the show, motion picture lighting has been left sitting backstage. Yet, lighting technology has been undergoing a steady transformation that may change broadcast and motion picture production more than anything.For those who haven’t been watching closely, here’s a quick update.

Not long ago, the industry lived in an incandescent bubble. Tungsten lights had been the industry standard since the advent of motion pictures. As digital technologies transformed camera sensitivity and mobility, lighting packages were slow to evolve.

 

The History of Digital Television: A Q&A with Marc Tayer

2015 NAB Lighting & Batteries Review

In recent years, alternative lighting technologies were introduced, including fluorescent, halogen, LED (light-emitting diode), and LEP (light-emitting plasma). HMI lights have been a standard for daylightbalanced instruments for decades.

Each lighting alternative enters the market and is evaluated next to the tungsten or HMI standard. The primary goal at this point is to produce a lighting instrument that emulates a tungsten or daylight color profile, is as bright or brighter than existing lights, produces less heat, and requires less power. That’s a list that sounds like the quest for alchemy. But surprisingly, these ambitious goals seem to be within reach.

Read more here: http://www.tvtechnology.com/news/0086/lighting-technology-joins-the-digital-age/274611

Remote Phosphor LED Lights from Cineo Lighting (4K Shooter January 2015)

Remote Phosphor LED lights from CINEO Lighting

 

Lately, I’ve been researching various brands offering LED lighting solutions to upgrade my existing predominantly tungsten based lighting kit. My tungsten kit consists of a couple of ARRI 650 Plus fresnels, and a 300w Arrilite (really old), and although I love them, they’ve been around for some ears and frankly I am tired of lugging them around all the time. I also have a 3 light kit from Ianiro (again good old tungsten 150’s I used for interviews as rim and background lights as they ain’t too harsh), but even with softboxes all my tungsten lights are adding a lot of bulk to my kit and heat on set.

I’ve experimented with some cheap LED’s but never gotten satisfactory results. I do have a MicroPro LED on-camera light form Litepanels, which I’ve used for many years and I’ve used it on all my music videos and the feature film I directed last year. It’s a small and versatile light that never leaves my kit bag. They’re not perfect, but they do the job. I am not a huge fan of the fact that it requires 6 AA batteries and constantly recharging those can often be a rather boring, unnecessary, and frustrating experience, one which I’d like to avoid in the future.

I remember seeing a video from NAB a year or so ago so I decided to revisit the phosphor LED lighting options from CINEO.

Cineo TruColor HS

The TruColor® HS™ from Cineo Lighting (pictured above) is remote phosphor based LED light of high colour accuracy. It’s an interesting light, very soft, and multiple shadows stemming from multiple LED diode units found in common LED 1×1’s and other LED film lights are avoided here. It’s quite a powerful light for its size – it produces more than twice the output of a 2K incandescent soft light, and has a high CRI of over 95, generates a 160-degree beam spread, and uses less than 500 watts of AC power.

Read more here:  http://www.4kshooters.net/2015/02/12/remote-phosphor-led-lights-from-cineo-lighting/

Modern Family: Jeff Cronenweth, ASC on Gone Girl (ICG Magazine October 2014)

A 6K Data-intensive workflow enables Jeff Cronenweth, ASC, to chase down a “gone girl” in his newest collaboration with David Fincher.A series of mysteries form the core for the best-selling novel Gone Girl and its film adaptation, the subject of which is a married couple’s difficulties after they lose their writing jobs and move from the east coast to Missouri. The big question marks in Gillian Flynn’s popular book (as well as her own screenplay adaptation) are: to where has Amy Dunne (Rosamund Pike) disappeared, and is her husband Nick (Ben Affleck) involved? Other aspects relate to how well Nick will stand up to suspicions from the police and the media, and if the case’s very public exposure is ultimately beneficial or detrimental in resolving Amy’s fate.Oscar-nominated filmmaker David Fincher describes Flynn’s novel as a “wicked look at marital resentments. While it’s at times a heightened thing, with moments that are deliberately absurd, I think Gillian’s book touched a nerve because it gave a voice to genuine concerns about cohabitation,” he shares.

“Nobody has been so profound in delivering this message, especially in so striking a way,” Fincher adds. “I felt it was both original and diabolical, while demonstrating how difficult it is to even imagine any relationship surviving the kind of scrutiny that arises out of the media side of things on a case like this.”

Fincher relied on a number of familiar behind-the-scenes collaborators to propel his first data-intensive (6K-capture) workflow, including director of photography Jeff Cronenweth, ASC, who began his feature career on the director’s Fight Club and more recently lensed Fincher’s The Social Network and The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.

Cronenweth contrasts the way he illuminates Gone Girl’s protagonists with his approach on his first feature collaboration with Fincher. “In Fight Club you often can’t see the eyes on the main two guys,” he observes. “In addition to being unnerving, it was valuable in showing how shallow these guys were. Then, when we chose to bring the eyes out, it worked well in showing them as two facets of the same person. On this film, the intensity of the relationships between these people and the mystery surrounding it all was such that you really had to be able to see their eyes to have some idea of how this psychological chess game between this very dysfunctional couple played out.”

_DSC7018.NEF

The RED EPIC Dragon 6K camera makes its feature debut in the film. “David and I were the first to use the Mysterium chip on The Social Network,” notes Cronenweth. “During the shoot on Dragon Tattoo we switched over to Epic when memory cards became available. After that I shot Hitchcock on the Red Epic.

Read more here: http://www.icgmagazine.com/web/?p=4601

Advances in Lighting Add More Versatility (TVTechnology August 2014)

Advances in Lighting Add More Versatility

Savvier customers seek better color output, lower power consumptionAugust 4, 2014

 

SEATTLE—When LED lighting fixtures hit the video and film production scene a decade ago, their advantages in areas like low-power consumption and heat generation made them an instant hit. In the years since then, advances in the LEDs themselves, in the phosphors that radiate the various colors, and in other technologies such as optics have allowed lighting equipment manufacturers to create new generations of lighting fixtures.The color output of LED fixtures is a much-discussed characteristic of lights today. “I think the customers are a lot more savvy,” said Charlie Collias, senior vice president of worldwide sales for Zylight in Los Angeles. “They’re looking for LEDs with high CRI, color rendering index values.”

 
 

Collias added that high CRI is particularly important on a set with mixed lighting equipment. “It’s important in the overall look of the show, especially when you mix LEDs and other light sources together.”Zylight’s F8 Fresnel LED fixture touts a special blend of Quantum nanoparticles with traditional phosphor technology. “It provides better spectral control, higher efficiency, higher color rendering, and the color pallet matches other lights on the set.”

 

A ‘PERFECT STORM’
Litepanels Senior Product Manager Ali Ahmadi said changing technologies have led the company to redesign its flagship product.

“We saw this perfect storm at the horizon, and so we pushed into this opportunity with our new Astra,” he said. “We’re taking the concept of a 1×1 panel and completely redefining it from the bottom up. We’re using new LED and phosphor technology, and basic advances in optics, making high-quality optics accessible at an affordable price-point.”

The Astra provides an even softer light, and four times the intensity of a traditional 1×1 panel. “We’ve created a completely different optical system with the new generation LEDs and the lenses that sit in front of them,” he said. “That basically creates an optical engine that drives that light output. A lot of light comes out the front, and then it mixes immediately outside the fixture, which is how we’re able to create that soft look.”

http://www.tvtechnology.com/article/advances-in-lighting-add-more-versatility/271332

Cineo’s new Maverick and Matchstix remote phosphor lights for on-the-go shooters (News Shooter May 2014)

NAB 2014 video: Cineo’s new Maverick and Matchstix remote phosphor lights for on-the-go shooters

 

By site editor Dan Chung:

 

Newsshooter at NAB 2014: Cineo lights from Dan Chung on Vimeo.

Newsshooter.com technical editor Matt Allard talks to Tricia Maas of Cineo about their latest remote phosphor lights. She explains how the technology works and how it differs from a regular LED panel light.

They also discuss the new Maverick panel for on-the-go shooters – a dc powered weatherproofed soft light with the equivalent output of a traditional 1K. Colour Rendering Index (CRI) is claimed to be over 95, which should make for much more accurate colour reproduction.

Also very interesting for news and documentary shooters is the Matchstix line of small light sticks that can be easily placed in the most awkward of locations. These run on 11.5 to 16V DC power and can be dimmed using Litedimmers from Litegear.

To find out more go to the Cineo website.

Read more here: http://www.newsshooter.com/2014/05/01/nab-2014-video-cineos-new-maverick-and-matchstix-remote-phosphor-lights-for-on-the-go-shooters/

Cineo Lighting Announces New Maverick Portable at NAB (Geek News Central April 2014)

Cineo Lighting Announces New Maverick Portable at NAB



Cineo LightingCineo Lighting is bringing something new to NAB 2014 – the Cineo Maverick. It is the newest member of the TruColor family from Cineo Lighting. The Cineo Maverick is portable and provides all of the benefits of Remote Phosphor Technology that is found in the TruColor HS and LS.

The Cineo Maverick meets the demands of field use. It is portable, lightweight, DC powered, and weatherproof. This makes it ideal for photographers who need to bring lighting to an outdoor shoot. Cineo Maverick delivers a volume of light equal to a traditional 1K soft source. It is optimized for image capture as well as other applications that would require accurate color rendering.

There is a wide array of accessories, power supply, and mounting options that work with Cineo Maverick. This helps make it another indispensable tool for motion picture and television professionals. You can check out Cineo Maverick at NAB 2014. Cineo Lighting will be at booth C157. 

 

NAB 2014 Product Spotlight

Now that the 2014 NAB show in Las Vegas is over it’s time to do some coverage! Starting on April 11th and going until the end of the month I will be doing a spotlight on what was good at the show. Each day I’ll focus on something new that I saw. *note* These are being released in no particular order*

Cineo Matchstix Lights

NAB was completely inundated with LED lighting options this year. So, how does a company stand out? They offer something that no other company does. Cineo Lighting (cineolighting.com) does just that. Their lights use a Remote Phosphor technology that makes them easier to scale than standard LEDs.

IMG_1225

They have a full line of completely dimmable and color controlled lights, but what really caught my eye were the Matchstix. These little lights pack a mean punch, and I could see them being the perfect option for lighting an interior car scene.

Screen shot 2014-04-14 at 8.57.21 AM

They’re small, compact, and the extended cold-shoe mount on the back means they can be mounted a million different ways. The Matchstix come in 6″ and 12″ models, in one of four colors (2700K, 3200K, 4300K, or 5600K). But, because the light balance come not from the bulb, but from a phosphorous plate, you can purchase different color panels to change out the balance.

Screen shot 2014-04-14 at 8.56.37 AM

At the show the sales rep I was talking to was saying that a kit with both a 12″ and a 6″ light, in your chosen color balance, plus power supply, and a case would run ~$800. It’s a tad on the high side, but if these lights perform on set the way I think they would, it’d be worth the little extra cash.

Screen shot 2014-04-14 at 8.58.12 AM

Cineo has a whole range of soft lights, check them out on the website (cineolighting.com) and follow them on twitter (@CineoLighting) for information and giveaways. I look forward to seeing what these little powerhouses can do.

563798_210353815755335_1030853263_n

 

Post NAB 2014 Spotlight: Cineo Matchstix Lights

Post NAB 2014 Spotlight: Cineo Matchstix Lights

Cineo Grows TruColor Family

hero

Cineo Matchstix Lights

NAB was completely inundated with LED lighting options this year. So, how does a company stand out? They offer something that no other company does. Cineo Lighting (cineolighting.com) does just that. Their lights use a Remote Phosphor technology that makes them easier to scale than standard LEDs.

IMG_1225

They have a full line of completely dimmable and color controlled lights, but what really caught my eye were the Matchstix. These little lights pack a mean punch, and I could see them being the perfect option for lighting an interior car scene.

Screen shot 2014-04-14 at 8.57.21 AM

They’re small, compact, and the extended cold-shoe mount on the back means they can be mounted a million different ways. The Matchstix come in 6″ and 12″ models, in one of four colors (2700K, 3200K, 4300K, or 5600K). But, because the light balance come not from the bulb, but from a phosphorous plate, you can purchase different color panels to change out the balance.

Read more here: http://widenmedia.com/post-nab-2014-spotlight-cineo-matchstix-lights/

Cineo Grows TruColor Family (American Cinematographer October 2013)

Cineo Grows TruColor Family

Cineo Lighting has introduced the TruColor LS, a smaller, flexible addition to its TruColor family of soft lights.

     

The TruColor LS brings all of the advantages of the TruColor HS to a smaller, lower-priced package. The TruColor LS outputs up to 8,000 lumens using Cineo’s Remote Phosphor Technology (RPT) and boasts an aperture size comparable to that of an iPad. Interchangeable RPT panels allow color temperatures between 2,700°K and 6,500°K, matching the color quality of the TruColor HS.

“TruColor LS is a versatile source that delivers a large volume of color-accurate light even in tight spaces,” says Chris Varrin, Cineo’s CTO. “The fixture’s output matches a 1K soft source while drawing less than 150 watts.”

TruColor LS features several power options, including a small AC supply, DC, and the ability to gang several LS heads on a single HS power supply with independent DMX control. Like all of the TruColor products, LS operates flicker-free at up to 10,000 fps.


www.cineolighting.com
– See more at: http://www.theasc.com/new_products/October2013/index.php#prod1919http://www.theasc.com/new_products/October2013/index.php#prod1919